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Posts from the ‘Moral Panics’ Category

25
Oct
baby-flash-games-163 (1)

“The Simpsons”

Contributor: Maira Jorge

Co-executive producers Matt Groening, Sam Simon, and James L. Brooks directed their controversial and well-known cartoon series, “The Simpsons,” for the adult audience from their first appearance in 1987 in between sketches of “The Tracy Ullman Show”. [1]  The satire of a dysfunctional American family, however, grabbed the attention of the entire family, whether with wide acceptance or extremely negative criticisms.  Indeed, one of its creators, Simon, recognized how offensive the show might result to some Americans and admitted that he was made nervous by “so much angry mail, and because kids like the show so much”. [2]
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25
Oct
Cover of YM magazine, 2000

Britney Spears

Cover of YM magazine, 2000

Contributor: Emily Garza

Last March as I was reading my little niece’s birthday wish list I began to experience what I thought was a mild heart attack. The list was deluged with what I considered to be acceptable presents for an eight-year-old girl. There was the typical Barbie, sneakers, clothes, a new bicycle and then there it was, “Miley Cyrus CD”. As I read that much-publicized name, images of hip thrusting, older boyfriends, and scandalous personal pictures ran through my mind. I quickly began going over in my head the much-needed lecture my niece was going to get. Then boom! It hit me, I had turned into my mother.  Read more »

25
Oct
Classic "gross" "Ren and Stimpy" close-up

“The Ren and Stimpy Show”

Classic "gross" "Ren and Stimpy" close-up

Contributor: Allyson Burton

Like many children who grew up during the 1990s, I enjoyed watching television. The channel I watched the most often was Nickelodeon, despite my parents’ distaste for some of the shows. I distinctly remember my mother’s voice as she said, “I wish you wouldn’t watch that…” “The Ren and Stimpy Show” (a cartoon created by John Kricfalusi that ran on Nickelodeon from 1991-1998) was my parents’ least favorite because it was “gross”. It centered on the characters Ren and Stimpy, who the Internet Movie Database describes as “An intense, hyperactive Chihuahua…and a happy-go-lucky, empty-brained cat.” [1] IMDB summarizes the show itself as “The gross misadventures of a hyper Chihuahua and a stupid cat.” [2] Read more »

25
Oct
MTV-mtv-70396_700_554

MTV

Contributor: Corynn Wilson

The Buggles’ “Video Killed the Radio Star” could not have been more perfect for the first music video to air on MTV in 1981, merging television and music to create the ultimate pop culture phenomenon.[1] Proceeding through the 80s, MTV served as a transformative, youth-targeting source of hit music that soon became the leading market for artists and record companies. MTV’s market became such a straight ticket to the youth’s influence (thus its sky-high value) that its content evolved through the next two decades from a “kind of video jukebox,” Steve Johnson writes in the Los Angeles Times, to an abundance of teenage-directed advertisements, campaigns, and most importantly, television shows[2]. Read more »